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PRUSSIA


The 'Landwehr' Cross. This symbol later became distinctive of reserve and Landwehr formations and it took the same form as the Iron Cross, which was also founded in 1813.

Background

The Cavalry

The Artillery

Organisation &Tactics

Arms & Equipment

Flags & Standards

Bibliography & Sources


(A) With Stegen and the cockade mounted on the left side.


(B) The more usual Landwehr cap with the cockade below the cross.

The Army

The Infantry - The Uniforms of the Landwehr Infantry



The size, nature and conditions of recruitment of the Landwehr inevitably resulted in a force that was poorly equipped and clothed. The Prussian economy was fully extended trying to cope with the requirements of the regular and reserve formations even before the foundations of the Landwehr and it is , therefore, not surprising to find that in the first few months of existence, its state was truly lamentable. Initially, the men of the Landwehr wore clothing that was made of shoddy, their caps protected them against neither sword cuts nor rain, and even these poor garments were in short supply. By the autumn of 1813, the worst deficiencies had been overcome and by the time of Waterloo, the Landwehr can be said to have been adequately armed and clothed.

Regulations covering the dress and equipment of the Landwehr were drawn up in March 17, 1813. The Uniform was to consist of a 'Litewka' , made of blue or black cloth. The collar was in provincial colour; in the skirts were vertical pockets, each being closed by a single button and down the front of the garment ran either one or two rows of metal buttons. The length of the Litewka varied considerably and terminated at any point from mid-thigh, to well below the knee. There was a tendency to indicate battalions within a regiment with shoulder straps similar in colouring to those used by the regular army to indicate seniority. By 1815 it was normal for a regimental number to be embroidered onto the shoulder strap.



Prussian Landwehr Infantry Privates c. 1814.